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Interesting facts about Bio Fuels

Apr 09, 2017 0 comments
Interesting facts about Bio Fuels

Algae is the unwanted slime in your home aquarium or the goo that’s putting you off going for a swim in your public lake. It can grow almost everywhere there is water and sunlight, and under the right conditions it can double its volume within hours. Scientists and industrialists agree that its potential is huge. It can grow in fresh water, polluted water or even sea water.  It is used to purify your sewage and it also consumes nearly twice its weight in carbon dioxide, the most common greenhouse gas that is discharged by vehicles.

There are several types of algae:

Blue green algae/cyanobacteria:

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More closely related to bacteria than other algae they are often the scum on polluted, over-fertilized, under- circulated/aerated waters. They are characteristically slimy and bluish-black. Forms include single cells, clusters, threads and chains. Green Algae: Are in fact the most commonly encountered; they are found almost everywhere. Occur as attached, floating, swimming forms and seasonal surface blooms. Red and Brown Algae: These are typically marine; you maybe know them as kelps, attached seashore forms. Dinoflagellates and Diatoms: Are microscopic algae, single celled, and mostly helpful in terms of nutrient cycling, and oxygen production.

We’re living in a time when depending too much on oil for energy needs could prove tricky. That’s why now the research on biofuel has been rerun.

Biofuel can be achieved from almost any organic product, from agriculture wastes to dung, including that of wild animals. Now researchers retake in account algae-based fuels, being helped by the recent advances in genomics and biotechnology.

Algae are a natural oil-producer, offering multiple paths to biofuel. They can easily be genetically engineered to achieve varieties that generate high amounts of oil that can be turned into bio crude and refined into gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel; those with less carbon atoms can be processed and fermented to make ethanol.

Algae can be grown on land outworn for other crops and using water unsuitable for agriculture purposes, they do not interfere with food production, and oil-per-acre production can be much higher than for industrial crops like soybeans. And their oil production can be boosted even more.

This unique technology could also be a hit in limiting carbon dioxide emissions whilst reusing it in renewable fuels, economically and even without retooling method. Research and experiments showed a roughly 80 % carbon dioxide capture rates throughout the daylight hours. We’re living in a time when depending too much on oil for energy needs could prove tricky.

That’s why now the research on biofuel has been rerun.

Biofuel can be achieved from almost any organic product, from agriculture wastes to dung, including that of wild animals. Now researchers retake in account algae-based fuels, being helped by the recent advances in genomics and biotechnology.

Algae are a natural oil-producer, offering multiple paths to biofuel. They can easily be genetically engineered to achieve varieties that generate high amounts of oil that can be turned into bio crude and refined into gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel; those with less carbon atoms can be processed and fermented to make ethanol.

Algae can be grown on land outworn for other crops and using water unsuitable for agriculture purposes, they do not interfere with food production, and oil-per-acre production can be much higher than for industrial crops like soybeans. And their oil production can be boosted even more.

Oil extraction from algae is a fiercely debated subject currently simply because this entire process is one of the most expensive processes which can actually determine the sustainability of algae based bio diesel. We all can make a difference to the retail cost of this energy source only if we understand the principals involved. So please start to read up on the facts. Then we can make an informed protest to the high prices which we will be asked to pay for this fuel in the near future.

As the United States and the European Union rush to find solutions to global climate change many less than ideal choices are being selected. Consider the growing demand for the biofuel E85. According to the Clean Air Trust in 2007 one out of every eight gallons of gas sold contains ethanol. What is E85? E85 is an ethanol based biofuel. In the United States it is largely produced from corn.

The corn based biofuel – unseen risks of E85

In the United States, our government has made the decision to back the corn based E85 biofuel. This government led support has dramatically increased demand for E85. How does the demand for biofuels like E85 affect us? Does it affect our health? Does it affect our environment? These questions become important when we consume more than four billion gallons of ethanol each year.

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Clean burning ethanol?

Whilst it is very true that when pure ethanol is burned, it emits less carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons compared to pure gasoline, it is also very true that we hardly burn pure ethanol in our automobiles. We burn E10, E85, E5 and E95, all ethanol mixes of variable purity and the common being the E85. E85 is roughly 15% petroleum and about 85% ethanol. When you compare burning E85 to pure ethanol, burning E85 is excessively toxic. According to data from the Clean Air Trust, burning E85 produces “formaldehyde, peroxyacetyl nitrate and acetaldehyde.”

Burning food to get fuel

Each and every day almost 800 million people in most developing nations do not get enough food to eat. This results in hunger and in some cases starvation. When we choose to convert food crops such as corn into biofuels like E85, we force food prices up. As the prices of food continue rising, it inevitably becomes expensive and unaffordable to many of the world poorest. Recently, the World Food Program warned that rapidly rising food costs and threatening emergency food supplies.

Are all biofuels bad?

All biofuels are not bad. When efficiently produced or when produced from organic waste such as waste chocolate near their local markets biofuels may be part of the solution to global climate change. As an environmentally conscious consumer it is up to you to understand the differences between various types of biofuels and to see through potential green washing.

Dave Steen

About The Author: Dave is a 58 year old survivalist; father of three; with over 40 years of survival experience. He started young, learning survival the hard way, in the school of hard knocks. Now, after years of study, he's gray-haired and slightly overweight. That hasn't dimmed his interest in survival though. If anything, Dave has a greater commitment to survival than ever, so that he can protect his family. Click Here To Read More About Dave


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